ABUSE OF VULNERABLE ADULTS

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FAMILY LAW

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If a family member is being looked after in residential hospital care or a nursing home, you will expect them to be safe. Sadly, sometimes that is not the case. Residents in hospital care or nursing homes are some of the most vulnerable in society.

Residents in hospital care or nursing homes are some of the most vulnerable in society. Those in residential care range from young adults with mild learning disabilities who need support to live semi-independently all the way to those with the most severe learning and physical disabilities who require 24 hour care. Residents in nursing homes are often elderly with significant health needs or cognitive impairments. The nature of a resident’s age and/or disability often means that they are extremely vulnerable to physical/psychological abuse or neglect.
They are often unable to speak up for themselves or unable to realise (because of their cognitive impairments or learning disabilities) when they are victims of abuse. They may feel unable to report incidents of abuse for fear of reprisals from their abuser. They may be living in a placement where the abuse of residents is seen as normal day-to-day activity and residents assume that it is just something that they have to deal with on their own.

Residents in hospital care or nursing homes are some of the most vulnerable in society. Those in residential care range from young adults with mild learning disabilities who need support to live semi-independently all the way to those with the most severe learning and physical disabilities who require 24 hour care. Residents in nursing homes are often elderly with significant health needs or cognitive impairments. The nature of a resident’s age and/or disability often means that they are extremely vulnerable to physical/psychological abuse or neglect.
They are often unable to speak up for themselves or unable to realise (because of their cognitive impairments or learning disabilities) when they are victims of abuse. They may feel unable to report incidents of abuse for fear of reprisals from their abuser. They may be living in a placement where the abuse of residents is seen as normal day-to-day activity and residents assume that it is just something that they have to deal with on their own.

Deprivation of Liberty
Deprivation of liberty means taking away someone’s right to freely move around and live where they want to live.
Deprivation of liberty can include:

  • being kept in a locked room or ward
  • not being free to go anywhere without supervision or permission.

People may be subject to deprivation of liberty in care homes, hospitals or in their own home. This can be challenged whether proper processes have been followed or not. Reviews are important too.
We have extensive knowledge in this complex area of law and a deep understanding of the worry, concern and difficulties people can face in relation to it.
Our mental capacity teams support people every step of the way and understand the sense of urgency that can be involved when a local authority, hospital or care home is depriving someone you care about of their liberty.

Stephen Walsh & Co Solicitors can
assist you to plan ahead

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WHO WE CAN HELP

People our deprivation of liberty lawyers support include:

  • parents whose grown up child is being deprived of their liberty
  • people who have a loved one who has been sectioned
  • advocates for people lacking mental capacity
  • individuals who have been deprived of their liberty by a caregiver
  • people with dementia, autism and learning disabilities
  • anyone facing issues relating to lack of mental capacity/the ability of an individual to make their own decisions.

We can support you across Ireland. Do get in touch to discuss how we can help.

Talk to one of our Solicitors today. Call us on 045 881193